I just returned from a very full 3 weeks of road and air travel that took me to London, Uganda and Kenya. Yesterday as I was about to enter my apartment building in New York with my luggage, a neighbor who held the door open for me seemed relieved to see me. I recognized her but don’t know her personally. She went on to tell me of the Malaysian Airlines jet that had been shot down over Ukraine while I was in the air, killing all 298 on board…

It was a sobering welcome home and yet also an indication of the volatility of the world we live in. There were a number of these reminders during my journey.

The first of which was hearing – a day late on July 4- of the US terrorism alert on the Entebbe Airport in Uganda. I’d come through the airport 4 days before but a colleague I was going to be traveling with had arrived there the previous day. By all accounts, the airport was calm and thankfully, there was no incident.

Several days later, in Bundibugyo, a district in the southwest of Uganda where I lived in 2006-2007, fighting broke out between rival ethnic groups. In fact there were multiple coordinated attacks in the space of a few hours on the afternoon of July 5. Reports suggested up to 80 people were killed, both civilians and uniformed personnel and quickly this remote place was unexpectedly propelled into the international news. The fighting came as close as 8 kilometers from where we were staying and a strike on a trading center much closer was threatened but never occurred. This prompted an evacuation of the mission team we were visiting, cutting short our already brief visit by more than 24 hours. Fortunately we were never in any danger and as non-Ugandans were not targeted, but it made for a dramatic and tense return to a place I used to call home.  Shortly after we drove out, the road was closed once again due to more fighting and the team who’d evacuated remained out of the district for a full week. It seems the tensions have been quelled – at least for now.

Then, in Nairobi for the first time, I heard repeated references to the high crime rate and found myself more concerned than usual about whether and when I moved around with my passport and where my money was stashed. I stayed with friends who placed a heavy chain on a metal grate to their apartment each evening essentially barricading themselves in, even though their building was in a gated compound where 24 hour security guards hovered by a locked gate. Often when we rode around town, the windows were kept up and the AC on though I think this was less to prevent crime and more so we could hear each other speaking above the intensity of the traffic.

Suffice it to say, I’m glad to be back in New York because it’s familiar and it’s home. And the truth of the matter is: God is here – as He is everywhere.  Even when planes get shot out of the sky and groups that have lived side by side struggle over power and land rights, and urban crime makes us feel less secure.

He is in this place.

 

 

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